Posts Tagged ‘process’

True Up post and other fun news

Sunday, March 20th, 2011

Back on February 22nd, Kim Knight from True Up posted a few images of the new prints available in fabric form. There are three artwork styles available in six different color ways each. Thanks to my husband and his excellent structural skills, I have a 16ft. print table that allows me to print up to 4.5 yds continuously. I love love this table and the gratification of printing the entire fabric width myself, but I’ve run into a bit of a problem lately… I’m almost 20 weeks pregnant and my belly is starting to affect the length of my reach across the table! (aka “other fun news) Guess I’ll have to teach my husband how to screen print. Ha ha.

Here is an entry from June 5th, 2010 which explains the process.

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It took a bit of work and research to figure out how to print full coverage prints by myself. You might wonder why this is difficult. Well… it all has to do with the size of the screens (more or less a stencil) used for printing. Most full coverage prints are hand screened using two people. The length of the screen covers the width of the fabric (58″-60″) and a person stands on each side of the table, passing the squeegee and ink back and forth in one pass and the repeat only has match up on two sides. What I wanted to do was to be able to print full coverage prints by myself so I designed the patterns to fit in screens that only spanned half the table width. By doing this I could print a full repeat by alternating down each side of the table myself. The difficult part was designing patterns, for the screens, that had to match up on four sides, instead of two.

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Full coverage textile prints

Monday, June 7th, 2010

The past few months have been very exciting for me in the studio. My goal, beginning this past winter, was to create patterns that covered more of the fabric ground and went edge to edge (the width) of my linen yardage. It took a bit of work and research to figure out how to print full coverage prints by myself. You might wonder why this is difficult. Well… it all has to do with the size of the screens (more or less a stencil) used for printing. Most full coverage prints are hand screened using two people. The length of the screen covers the width of the fabric (58″-60″) and a person stands on each side of the table, passing the squeegee and ink back and forth in one pass and the repeat only has match up on two sides. What I wanted to do was to be able to print full coverage prints by myself so I designed the patterns to fit in screens that only spanned half the table width. By doing this I could print a full repeat by alternating down each side of the table myself. The difficult part was designing patterns, for the screens, that had to match up on four sides, instead of two.

The pillows in the image above show the three new full coverage prints on white linen. The patterns are from left to right: ani windflower, fugi floral and prairie grass. All three patterns are available in six different color combinations. The pillows in the image below show another color option on pebble colored linen.

Here’s an image of the new 16 ft printing table that my business partner/ husband built for me in the studio. What you can’t see in this photo is the metal rails that run down the length of the table and hold my new large screens in place so that I can print full coverage prints by myself. I had just printed a duvet on this day so the rails were unscrewed and place underneath the table. As you can see, the studio space is still not finished yet. Cross your fingers… this will happen soon!

Evolving design

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

If you’ve ever noticed the irregularities in three sheets 2 the wind artwork, it’s because I hand paint the image in the screen. I began doing it this way because I liked seeing the thick and thin line weight that was created by the brush. I can use an original hand painted screen for months before the material starts to break down. At that point I have the screen remade using the photo emulsion method which is way more durable for all the frequent washings my screens go through. I keep every irregularity and paint drip in the screen though when it changes over to a more permanent version.

Because I use a brush to create the original artwork, I can go back into the screen at any point and tweak things. Lately, I changed the background artwork for trees in spring. The original artwork was just a bit too big for the wall print size.

You can see how the new design is slightly smaller and less angled to the left.

Recycling sample prints

Thursday, October 1st, 2009

It happens when I am cleaning up the print table and I look down at the stack of first run prints and I find something really interesting. Who knew that blossom tree looked so cool when layered on top of trees in spring? Then, when I’m not looking, I print flower bed in black and 360 floral in white on top and voila! I’ve got something completely new.

These little linen treasures get pulled out the pile and hang on my wall for awhile. They inspire future projects and help me think outside the box. It reminds me of the time I went to go see Eames Demetrios speak at a DWR in Columbus a few years back. (grandson of Charles and Ray) He was telling the group how in the evening when everyone left the studio, they used to hang the chairs they were working on from the ceiling. Upside down – sideways – whatever they could think of to make for a new image or form to look at in the morning. Brilliant!

So, as I work on finding new ways to look at my work for the first time… I hope to inspire others with these miniature studies. I’ve picked each print personally from my collection and had them stitched onto organic cotton totes. Since each piece is considerably different, I’ve created two color options: a blue/green color story or an orange/green color story.

Off to the studio I go!

A plate of inspiration

Wednesday, November 19th, 2008

Strangely enough, the winter months are when I sit and work on new illustrations. In just a few months, I’ll be rolling out new artwork for Spring 2009. I’m really excited to finally get two-color artwork in the collection. Think orange and blue, green and yellow! It will be a fantastic visual link between the linear styles and the more bold (forms) art styles. The plan is to make over the wall print and pillow collections mostly, but I also have a few other tricks up my sleeve for spring!

Jenny